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LHS Bond Passes, 75% In Favor

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The big news everyone was talking about today…the approval of the Lewiston High School bond. But now that the voting is over, the real work begins.

KLEW News Reporter Shannon Moudy joins us in-studio with what that means.

The Lewiston School District has wasted no time. Board President Brad Rice says they’ve already begun the process. Many on both sides are still reeling from last night’s results.

"In some ways it was surreal,” said Rice. “There's been some shock and awe because of the margin of victory. People were just very excited, happy, it was pretty emotional."

Lewiston School Board President Brad Rice, along with a crowd of supporters, cheered, hugged, and cried after Jesse Maldanado announced the results Tuesday night. Lewiston is getting a new high school.

"It's obvious the people of the city of Lewiston want a new high school. I mean there's no question about it,” said Ken Krahn, former LHS Administrator. “The voters spoke and that's the way it'll be."

On the opposition’s side, there was a similar feeling of shock.

"Surprised at the big turnout and good for them they got their people out and they voted,” said Krahn. “Seventy-five percent speaks for itself."

Krahn credits the bond’s success to the financial and social media power of the ‘Yes LHS’ group.

Brad Rice says he believes it was the efforts of hundreds of volunteers, and also what was learned from the past’s failed bonds.

"I believe last night's win was the cumulative effect of more than a decade of work,” said Rice.

Now that its passed, the district will get to work figuring out the methodology of the bond sale. They’ll also meet with architects to finalize plans for the new high school.

"We are targeting having students in the new building in the fall of 2020,” said Rice.

The school district will be meeting with lawyers’ tomorrow (Thursday) to figure out their next steps, such as when the bond will be put on their budget. That will determine when taxpayers will start paying for it.

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